Kayaking/snorkeling in Vieques!

On our last day in Vieques, we rented a kayak (strapped to the top of the jeep) plus snorkeling gear and headed to the farthest beach on the Caribbean side of the island, La Plata, or Silver Beach. Our two sons set out on the open water for an unknown destination in the middle of the sea, out of sight, but NOT out of mind. (We were a bit worried.)

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It was hard to rest and relax in the hammock and enjoy this view.

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To occupy myself, I swam over to La Platita beach, where they have rocks stacked as a decoration.

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The boys finally made it back, excited about the fantastic snorkeling location they’d found. After being reassured by my eldest that I wouldn’t have any problems in the open sea, I went kayaking/snorkeling! Of course, HE is the one that did all the hard work paddling! And we did make it back safely.
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This is the last post on Vieques, but coming up soon – San Juan, Puerto Rico!

Mosquito Bay…sunsets at Vieques!

We went to Mosquito Bay two evenings to watch the beautiful sunsets! And I received LOTS of souvenirs all over my legs and they surely did itch. But the spectacular sunsets were worth it!

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You can see the differences in the colors and the sky those two nights! And by the way, none of my pictures are filtered and/or edited in any way…what you see is what is was!

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All About Vieques…

The New York Times called Vieques an “undiscovered jewel,” and I most definitely agree. The population of this 21 mile long island is 9,000 friendly people and wild horses, of course! The horses roam freely all over the island and on the road also, but they are used to vehicles!

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Vieques is undeveloped because of the US Navy presence for sixty years, but they’ve been gone for the last ten years. Some areas of the island are restricted, and in some places, there are bunkers (leftover from Navy days). We loved exploring unexpected places!

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There are only two main towns: Isabel Segunda, the economic center of the island, and Esperanza, a town along the beach with a great boardwalk. This is one evening along the Malecon, or boardwalk!

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There aren’t lots of places I want to travel to twice, but I would love to go to quaint and charming Vieques again!

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Vieques, things to do…

Even though the beaches are outstanding in Vieques (and virtually empty), there ARE other things to do!

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I don’t have pictures, but we went on a Biobay, (Bioluminescent, or Mosquito Bay tour) in a kayak one moonless night. This is the best spot in the world to see everything GLOW – fish, oars, our feet! The bay is the perfect spot for microorganisms to grow and they release energy in the form of light (like fireflies). There are over 700,000 per gallon of water!

One day we went to see the famous old ceiba tree; it’s between 300-400 years old and very majestic!

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We drove out mile long Mosquito Pier, which the US Navy constructed in 1941 and was abandoned after Pearl Harbor. These are some rock structures looking out to the Atlantic Ocean.

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Mosquito Pier is a wide earth pier that extends over 1 mile into Vieques Sound. It was constructed during 1941 as part of the US Navy’s plan to join Vieques and Puerto Rico with a breakwater to create an enormous naval harbor.Construction began in early 1941 and proceeded at the rapid pace of several meters a day. The plan was abandoned following the attack on Pearl Harbor and the United States’ entrance into World War II. – See more at: http://oceanislandtravel.com/home.asp?aid=286#sthash.SSYOpvP6.dpuf
Mosquito Pier is a wide earth pier that extends over 1 mile into Vieques Sound. It was constructed during 1941 as part of the US Navy’s plan to join Vieques and Puerto Rico with a breakwater to create an enormous naval harbor.Construction began in early 1941 and proceeded at the rapid pace of several meters a day. The plan was abandoned following the attack on Pearl Harbor and the United States’ entrance into World War II. – See more at: http://oceanislandtravel.com/home.asp?aid=286#sthash.SSYOpvP6.dpuf